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  • Terry Gilliam isn’t quitting on Don Quixote

    By | May 15, 2009

    lost_in_la_mancha

    The Man Who Killed Don Quixote is now back on from the man who aspires to never let it die, Mr. Terry Gilliam.

    The original October 2000 attempt at the film was captured in the documentary Lost In La Mancha, which chronicled the legendary plagued production of The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. In it we got a personal view of the filmmakers dealing with catastrophe after catastrophe – like the Spanish Air Force running training maneuvers over their location shoots, destructive bad weather, illness, insurance issues, legal battles, and so on, forcing Gilliam to abort production. The documentary should be seen by any aspiring filmmaker as an example of what can go wrong will go wrong, to prepare them for the worst.

    Lucky for us, Gilliam is hard headed and doesn’t like to give up. Now that he has prevailed through all the legal issues over the rights of the film, he is back to complete his vision. Gilliam and screenwriter Tony Grisoni have revised the screenplay since the previous production, which is loosely based on Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes’ classic novel El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha. The story follows a filmmaker sucked into the world of Don Quixote and becoming the old man’s Sancho Panza as he attempts to perform knightly deeds and win the heart of his lady Dulcinea.

    The original cast included  mega star Johnny Depp, who just finished up The Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus, with Gilliam. They are currently in discussions to have Depp reprise his original role, but scheduling may become an issue and prevent him from taking on the project.

    Jeremy Thomas  is back to produce the film under his Recorded Picture Company banner for a planned 2011 release. We wish you good luck this time Terry!


    Trivia: Orson Welles began the film Don Quixote in 1958. The film was never completed even though attemptes were made until his death in 1985.

    Topics: News | 1 Comment »

    • Lary

      The imagery from the first attempt still jumps around in my head every once in awhile. Let’s hope Gilliam can re-sign the cast and get this finished. Such a terrific story, Don Quixote could be told as a thousand hilarious, cautionary tales and both Welles’ and Gilliam’s attempts at this are not unlike the man of La Mancha’s attempts at knighthood and chivalry, fraught with peril!