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  • Missed Connections | Review

    AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL 2012

    By | October 20, 2012

    Director: Eric Kissack

    Writer: Kenny Stevenson

    Starring: Kenny Stevenson, Dorien Davies, Amir Talai, Jordan Black, Candace Brown, Mitch Silpa, Stephanie Escajeda, Scott Beehner, Eileen O’Connell, Julie Mitchell, Shane Elliott, Alex Enriquez

    Dating is difficult, especially in our technologically-driven society. Missed Connections, directed by Eric Kissack and written by Kenny Stevenson, is a romantic comedy focused on “chance” encounters. Neal (Kenny Stevenson) is not in the best place in life. His girlfriend cheated on him with his best friend; he works in soul-sucking customer service job; and his friends can’t even be bothered to show up to his birthday dinner. His friends, Barry (Shane Elliott) and George (Alex Enriquez), however, have decided to give Neal the greatest gift of all. They have devised a plan to get Neal laid.

    Barry’s idea is to seek out seemingly desperate women on Craigslist who post “Missed Connections”. He responds as the sought after male setting up a meeting time and place. When the so-called connection fails to appear, Neal is there as a consolation prize to woo the ladies in waiting. The plan seems fool-proof until Jane (Dorien Davies) appears multiples times as Neal’s missed connection.

    Missed Connections is charming and funny in many moments. However, there is a lack of character development, for Jane in particular, that impedes any sense of emotional depth between Neal and Jane. Also, why are women who seek sexual encounters desperate while men doing this are heroes? It’s completely absurd and quite tiresome to see in this day and age. The film is relatable, however, as more and more relationships begin through internet encounters. 

    Rating: 6/10

    Topics: Film Reviews, News | 1 Comment »

    • Joe Zinder

      I saw the film too. I don’t recall any point in the story where a woman seeks sexual encounters like the main male character. The female didn’t have sexual motives. And while the main guy’s friends think it’s cool, his actual interest fades as he realizes his behavior doesn’t address his pain. The main guy instead stops seeking sex and chooses monogamous love in the film I watched, which seems like a good discovery and message. It sounds like you’re bringing some of your own baggage about societal cliche’s to your review. I went in thinking this movie was going to be another stupid romantic comedy but left very surprised and happy that it wasn’t.