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    aGLIFF 2014

    By | September 9, 2014

     

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    The 27th annual Austin Gay & Lesbian Film Festival (aGLIFF) will run September 10–14, 2014 at the Alamo South Lamar in Austin, TX. Founded in 1987 — yes, it is Austin’s oldest film festival — aGLIFF27 boasts a diverse slate of approximately 50 features that promises to provide a well-rounded cinematic experience for every L, G, B, T, Q, I and A in the audience.

    Regardless of your gender and sexual orientation, there are plenty of worthwhile films on the aGLIFF27 slate that deserve your undivided attention. Sure, you might just want to take the opportunity at aGLIFF27 to catch Mysterious Skin, The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T, and Ed Wood on the big screen once again (or maybe even for the first time); but if you are looking to catch a few stand-outs from the 2014 film festival circuit, we wholeheartedly recommend:

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    Appropriate Behavior

    Appropriate Behavior

    Channeling the simplicity of the post-Mumblecore set (which means this film will be probably compared to Lena Dunham’s work), Akhavan presents a very realistic portrayal of a young woman struggling to balance her sexuality with her ethnicity in the “anything goes” atmosphere of Brooklyn. In Appropriate Behavior, “coming out” is not as simple as just stating your sexuality; for people of some ethnic and religious backgrounds, it can be a much more complicated statement to make.

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    Boy Meets Girl

    Boy Meets Girl

    Writer-director Eric Schaeffer’s Boy Meets Girl is about developing enough self-confidence to not care about what anyone else thinks; to be one’s true self and not what everyone wants you to be; to feel accepted and loved despite any perceived eccentricities or warts. Eschewing the crippling term “normal” and admirably avoiding presenting Ricky as an “Other,” Schaeffer’s film speaks to the importance of tossing aside the labels that inherently alienate human beings.

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    Ever

    Ever

    Anyone who has found it difficult to be happy again after the death of a significant other is sure to find a lot of authenticity in Josh Beck’s Ever, but this film’s real strength is in its depiction of sexuality. While it might be disconcerting to some that Ever’s recent history with male aggression and male stupidity is what triggers her explorations with lesbianism, Ever’s existential struggle is undeniably natural. Emily is probably the best possible person for Ever to explore her newly discovered feelings because she is so understanding of Ever’s hesitations. In Ever, sexuality is refreshingly not black and white. Ever and Emily were not born lesbians, they are both attracted to people’s personalities, not their gender. The most convincing aspect of Ever is the organic chemistry between Wendy McColm and Christina Elizabeth Smith.

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    Oh, and we may not have reviewed them yet, but Xavier Dolan’s Tom at the Farm and Hong Khaou’s Lilting are also pretty darn amazing. But for now, we’ll just leave you with a link to the all important ticketing information

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