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    Miss Stevens | SXSW Review

    Tuesday, March 15th, 2016

    Miss Stevens tackles an oft-told story in a refreshingly subtle and normalized manner, approaching the classic student-teacher romance from a very unique angle. Hart presents the subject in such a way that the moral grayness between right and wrong is much more pronounced, and by breaking convention from historical representations of this material, Hart creates a narrative arc that is not at all predictable.

    collective:unconscious | SXSW Review

    Monday, March 14th, 2016

    When some of the most invigorating and intriguing American independent filmmakers join together to interpret each other’s dreams on screen, cinematic magic is inevitable. The thought of Lily Baldwin (Sleepover LA), Frances Bodomo (Afronauts), Daniel Patrick Carbone (Hide Your Smiling Faces), Josephine Decker (Thou Wast Mild and Lovely), and Lauren Wolkstein (Social Butterfly) collaborating on a film project together should be mind-blowing to anyone who has paid close attention to any of these filmmakers.






    Cameraperson | SXSW Review

    Monday, March 14th, 2016

    Kirsten Johnson is the titular cameraperson behind some of the most critically acclaimed documentaries of the last couple of decades, including Citizenfour, The Invisible War, Darfour Now, Fahrenheit 9/11 and The Oath. With Cameraperson, Johnson utilizes footage shot throughout her career to deconstruct and reevaluate the documentary filmmaking process. Cameraperson is an incredibly profound treatise on the art of seeing, as Johnson teaches the audience how to watch and consume documentary films, making us more acutely aware of tools and tricks of the trade.






    Free In Deed | SXSW Review

    Saturday, March 12th, 2016

    Based on a true story and featuring a stellar supporting cast of non-actors, there are no happy endings to be found in this thought-provoking and haunting film and little light to be found amid the darkness of people abandoned by society, only to be ultimately betrayed by a faith they’ve turned to as a last means of escape.






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